Monthly Archives: September 2016

Cloud for Superior Customer Service

Along with enduring root canals and eliminating malware, dealing with customer service call centers probably ranks near the top of the “most painful experiences in life” list for many people.

Causes for the discomfort include: complex telephone trees that require a preposterous number of key presses to get anywhere; interminable hold times; agents who lack all but the most child-like expertise; and, most maddening: when a customer finally connects with someone who might actually help — they are frequently disconnected.

 

There has to be a better way. And, there is… in the cloud.

Cloud-based services and applications are making headway into reducing this customer service mess, allowing small business owners to affordably improve the customer experience with cool features that people love, including social media and mobile device interfaces.

 

The importance of customer service management (CSM)

According to a ClickFox survey

  • More than 50 percent of disgruntled customers will spread negative information to others in their social circles.
  • More than one-third of unhappy customers will completely stop doing business with a company that has wronged them.
  • Even worse, 60 percent of those people exposed to these negative comments in social media are influenced by them, meaning most people will avoid you if their friends say you stink.

Not only does this represent lost revenue from these particular customers, but it can wreak havoc on SMB marketing efforts (and budgets) that now have to overcome not just their competitors’ advertising messages but also the negative perceptions and bad word-of-mouth caused by these unpleasant customer service experiences.

 

Cloud solutions

Placing your customer service in the cloud better meets the expectations of customers who are increasingly connected to the web via mobile devices and, therefore, expect instant answers. Rather than deal with a call center, many even prefer self-service answers for their support issues, searching online to bypass traditional help desks altogether.

Businesses can enable this migration of customer service functions with an ever-increasing list of services, including Zendesk, Service Cloud, Desk.com, Parature, and Zoho. Most provide not only traditional phone, email and chat functions, but also integrate with social networks such as Twitter and Facebook to offer robust self-service options.

Mobile-specific CSM apps include Gripe, available for both iPhone and Android, which enables consumers to vote positively for a company with a “cheer” or complain with a “gripe,” both of which get posted to their Twitter and Facebook accounts while also messaging the company’s customer service department for quick resolution.

Managers Give Performance Reviews

In their current format, performance reviews are considered a waste of time by most managers and employees, new research finds. A study from Adobe found that more than 60 percent of both employees and bosses believe that performance reviews are outdated ways of managing performance. In addition, nearly 60 percent of employees think traditional reviews have no impact on how they do their job and are a needless HR requirement.

Currently, nearly 90 percent of the U.S. office workers go through structured performance reviews, which include written reviews, often with rankings and ratings, on a required timeline. [See Related Story: Forget Performance Reviews! This Works Better]

For managers, the traditional evaluation process can be quite time-consuming. The research found that, on average, managers spend 17 hours per employee preparing for a performance review.

“The findings from this survey show how time-consuming, cumbersome and demotivating performance reviews are for many employees,” Donna Morris, executive vice president of customer and employee experience at Adobe, said in a statement.

The study discovered that the current performance review structure used by many organizations causes a tremendous amount of stress among employees. Nearly 60 percent of employees said performance reviews put them in competition with their co-workers, and 61 percent believe that their ratings and rankings cause their boss to play favorites.

Reviews were found to be especially tough on younger employees. More than one-third of millennials surveyed reported crying after a performance evaluation, while 47 percent said they have looked for another job after a review. Another 30 percent said they have quit a job because of a performance review.

If employers don’t change how they conduct evaluations, they could have a hard time holding on to their youngest workers. More than 60 percent of the millennials surveyed said they would move to a new employer that didn’t have formal performance reviews, even if their pay and job level remained the same.

 

Endpoint Security Strategies

For those reluctant to say goodbye to signature-based malware protection, read on for the first of a four-part series that delves into why small and medium-sized businesses should rethink their current solutions and explore cloud-based strategies for endpoint protection.

 

We are gathered here today, with not-quite heavy hearts, to say farewell to a constant companion. Our “friend” was part of our daily lives, popping up at the oddest times, seemingly just to say “hi,” or – as in any other high-maintenance relationship – demand we drop everything to give it some attention right now.

Imperfect, needy and often intrusive, we nonetheless tolerated its presence as a necessity in this cruel, crazy world full of bad guys – until something radical came along that made our “friend” a casualty in the unceasing conflict that can be called “The Malware Wars.”

The radical new element in the fray? The cloud. So, join us in saying, “Rest in peace, signature-based antivirus program,” and, “Hello, cloud-based endpoint security strategies.”

 

The changing world of web threats

Signature-based antivirus protection arguably peaked in the late 1990s and has been playing catch-up with the blackhats ever since. File injection and other basic virus types were mostly supplanted by Trojans, worms, backdoors and other stealthier nasties, which the big antivirus companies responded to slowly, as these threats did not fit their model of a virus.

Demonstrating how ineffective some solutions are to this day, the notorious 12-year-old Back Orifice 2000 Trojan is still infecting machines, and one out of three web malware encountered in 4Q 2011 were zero day threats, which are completely undetectable by signature-based schemes.

Hackers are also increasingly using social media scams and phishing, with even LinkedIn notifications becoming fair game for delivering exploits. It is clearly a more complicated world in the security space, and only getting worse.

 

New devices, greater risks

Apart from this ever-present development of increasingly sophisticated malware, endpoint security strategies must take into consideration the proliferation of mobile devices used to access workplace email accounts, enterprise Wi-Fi connections and even corporate VPN tunnels. From a security viewpoint, this is a nightmare, especially because mobile devices are fast becoming the number one target for hackers, with both the iPhone and Android devices being compromised in greater numbers.

As downloading antivirus software and updating signatures on every single employee-owned device by IT personnel can prove impossible even for SMBs, it demonstrates that the signature-based approach is broken, and any solution needs to be easy to implement on both current and future endpoints for it to be considered viable.

 

How does the cloud fit in?

Cloud-based endpoint solutions protect devices by installing a small agent on them while keeping all of the detection algorithms on the cloud provider’s hardware. They protect against viruses, rootkits, zero-day threats, packet and port sniffing, and other intrusions by auto-detecting suspicious behavior and delivering a preemptive strike against exploits rather than react to an already-infected situation.